JSSSLL Special Seminar "Green Slavic Literatures: Ecocriticism in Central and Eastern Europe"

JSSSLL Special Seminar

"Green Slavic Literatures: Ecocriticism in Central and Eastern Europe"

 

Program:

Opening Remarks: Hikaru Ogura (Toyo University)

Lecture 1: Anna Barcz (Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society)

    How Literature Makes Environments Speak? The Case of Central Eastern Europe.

 Lecture 2: Tamara Hundorova (Shevchenko Institute of Literature)

    The Post-Chornobyl Library: Nuclear Discourse, Postmodernism and Post-Soviet Irony

 Closing Address: Susumu Nagayo (President of ISSSLL)

 Chair: Go Koshino (University of Tokyo)

 

Language: English

 

Date & Time: December 7 (Saturday) 15:00-18:00

Place: Room 212, Hobun Building 1, Hongo Campus, University of Tokyo

Organized by The Japan Society for the Study of Slavic Languages and Literatures (JSSLLL)

 

 How literature makes environments speak? The case of Central Eastern Europe

 The environmental cultures in Central Eastern Europe evolved from the world of highly instrumentalized relations towards nature. They represent the contaminated world: its contaminated language, landscape, memory and even history. And as such, their literature makes environments speak in various powerful literary texts that have accompanied the history of this contamination. In my talk, I will present the examples of this polyphony of voices in the tender mediation of literary language of poetry and prose including The Ice by Jacek Dukaj and Drach by Szczepan Twardoch where non-human agents receive a powerful environmental voice.

 

The Post-Chornobyl Library: Nuclear Discourse, Postmodernism and Post-Soviet Irony

 The Chornobyl discourse nowadays is not only associated with a socio-techno-ecological catastrophe that occurred in a certain time and place but also refers to the postapocalyptic text about the fate of modernity, culture, and human in the end of the 20th century. The Chornobyl nuclear apocalypse becomes an important cultural metaphor as well as a laboratory for the postmodern imagination. The post-Chornobyl library represents the mixture of voices, genres, and codes. It also signifies the emergence of texts that speaks of trauma and reflects the collisions of the post-Soviet time in Ukrainian culture. A carnivalization of the apocalypse is the main paradigm of the post-Chornobyl text.